The Royal Navy Tartan

The Royal Navy Tartan

‘For those in Peril on the Sea’ The design of the Royal Navy tartan encompasses those colours historically associated with the Senior Service: red, white and blue for the various ensigns, royal purple for its title, and all in a setting of navy blue: the sea, the endless sea. As such it is intended to provide a common bond between ‘sailors’ regardless of rank, and an identity for informal occasions, and even everyday wear.

The EAST LOTHIAN Tartan

The EAST LOTHIAN Tartan

The colours have been chosen to symbolize the leading role which the country the county has played in shaping the history of Scotland. Green represents its predominately rural landscape and gold the abundance and variety of its agriculture. Blue represents the Fifth of Forth and its many ports and fishing villages, and Purple symbolises the numerous historic castles. Black represents coal, first undercovered in Scotland by monks on the shores of Prestonpans.

The Sunderland Tartan

The Sunderland Tartan

By following this tradition the Sunderland District tartan has been created to provide a modern symbol for this ancient region, which not only reflects its history, but also strengthens its historical links with Scotland. The black and white of the original ‘Shepherd’s Check’ is combined with red from the badge of Sunderland Association Football Club.

The Newcastle Tartan

The Newcastle Tartan

The Newcastle tartan has been created to strengthen the area’s strong historical links with Scotland and uses the black and white of the original Shepherds’ Check with gold and blue from the badge of Newcastle United Football Club.

 The FIFE Tartan

The FIFE Tartan

RED is taken from the tartan of the Clan Macduff, traditionally the head of the Scottish army, and charged with crowning the Kings of Scotland. Their association with Fife dates back to the 11th. Century. BLUE represents the boundaries of the North Sea and the Firths of Tay and Forth, and PALE BLUE the two pairs of world-famous bridges which link Fife to the north and south. GOLD represents Fife’s royal heritage, and BLACK the coal which until recent times formed the backbone of its economy.

The Dunn Tartan

The Dunn Tartan

 The MIDLOTHIAN Tartan

The MIDLOTHIAN Tartan

GREEN represents the predominantly rural landscape of this ancient County: Dalkeith, or ‘meadowvale’ in old Scots, is one of Scotland’s earliest inhabited places.BLUE represents the Firth of Forth which forms the northern boundary, and PALE BLUE the rivers Esk and Almond which form its eastern and western boundaries. GOLD represents the grain which made Midlothian the bread-basket of Scotland, and BLACK the coal, first mined in Midlothian.

 The DUNBARTONSHIRE Tartan

The DUNBARTONSHIRE Tartan

The colours of the Dunbartonshire tartan have been chosen to symbolise the leading role which the County has played in shaping the history of Scotland, and have been woven together to produce a unique and distinctive design. BLUE represents the waters of Loch Lomond, and PALE BLUE the Firth of Clyde, gateway to the Atlantic. GREEN represents the predominantly rural landscape of the north of the County, BLACK the pathways to the Western Highlands, and PURPLE the royal heritage of Dumbarton.

The RENFREWSHIRE Tartan

The RENFREWSHIRE Tartan

The leading role which the County has played in shaping the history of Scotland, and have been woven together to produce a unique and distinctive design. GREEN represents the predominantly rural landscape of the south and east of the county, GOLD the rich yellow stone, mined in Giffnock and used to build the tenements of Glasgow. BLUE represents the Firth of Clyde and PALE BLUE its tradition in shipbuilding, and the trade routes across the Atlantic. BLACK represents the ironstone mined to fuel i

The West Lothian Tartan

The West Lothian Tartan

BLUE represents the Firth of Forth and the ports along its northern boundary, PALE BLUE the Forth rail Bridge and the Forth Road Bridge. GREEN represents the predominantly rural landscape of the south, with its rolling hills and open moors and BLACK the coal and oil, which until recently formed the backbone of its economy. PURPLE represents its unique royal heritage.

The AYRSHIRE Tartan

The AYRSHIRE Tartan

GREEN represents the predominantly rural landscape of the east and south, andGOLD the rich farmland which makes the name of Ayrshire synonymous with agriculture. BLUE represents the Irish Sea which forms its western boundary. BLACK the rich coal seams which fuelled its many industries. PALE BLUE represents the two districts of Kyle and Cunninghame, and PURPLE the third district of Carrick, birthplace of King Robert the Bruce, which together make up the County of Ayrshire.